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ASCO Gum Disease (comments from AAZV-L 0 T. Curro From: "Dr. Douglas Winter" <dwinter@animaldental.com> Subject: Re: [AAZV-L] ASCO gum disease Date: March 21, 2017 at 8:21:29 PM EDT To: "Janis Joslin" <jjoslin@westernu.edu> Cc: "Ric Berlinski" <ric.berlinski@Toledozoo.org>, "Rebecca Wells" <rebeccawellsdvm@gmail.com>, "aazv-l@googlegroups.com" <aazv-l@googlegroups.com> Local antibiotics (perioceutics) are best suited for use in periodontal pockets between 3 mm (or maximum normal depth for the species) and 5 mm. Pockets greater than 5 mm are too deep to effectively clean with closed root planing alone and therefore require periodontal surgery. Dental radiographs are needed to truly determine attachment loss and degree of PD. Depending on the dental radiographs and clinical assessment there are a variety of periodontal surgeries that can be done to eliminate the pocket and restore the gingival attachment (biological width). These advanced procedure can be very successful if done correctly. Unfortunately, while healing over the next 4 -6 weeks many of them fail due to the offending behavior (chewing/excessive grooming, etc.) or most often the lack of timely followup to assess healing and/or further manage the problem areas. Doug  Regards, Douglas K. Winter, DVM, Dipl. AVDC Midwest Animal Dentistry & Oral Surgery Wichita, KS (316)648-7377 On 21 Mar 2017, at 18:00, Janis Joslin wrote: The antibiotic emulsion is a tetracycline gel. I think MWI has it. It works great!   Janis Joslin, DVM Janis Ott Joslin, DVM Professor,  Zoo and Wildlife Medicine College of Veterinary Medicine Western University of Health Sciences 309 E. Second Street Pomona, CA 91766-1854 jjoslin@westernu.edu Phone: (909) 706-3486 FAX: (909) 469-5635 www.westernu.edu       From: aazv-l@googlegroups.com [mailto:aazv-l@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Ric Berlinski Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 2:15 PM To: Rebecca Wells <rebeccawellsdvm@gmail.com>; aazv-l@googlegroups.com Subject: RE: [AAZV-L] ASCO gum disease   If you can immob her again, and really flush out all the hair, down to the sockets, there are some of the antibiotic infused emulsions you can use to fill the space between the gum and the tooth.  They dissolve over about 6-8 weeks, and it allows the gingival tissue to bond back tightly around the tooth.  I think part of the issue you may be fighting is that you have the pocket around the tooth even after you clean it out, and she is filling it up again faster that it can seal itself off.  Just a thought.   Ric Berlinski, DVM Senior Staff Veterinarian Director, Animal Health and Nutrition The Toledo Zoo and Aquarium Office (419)-385-5721 X 2119 Fax (419)-385-6924   From: aazv-l@googlegroups.com [mailto:aazv-l@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Rebecca Wells Sent: Tuesday, March 21, 2017 4:40 PM To: aazv-l@googlegroups.com Subject: [AAZV-L] ASCO gum disease   Hello all- I have a female, asian small clawed otter that has a constant problem with hair wedged in her gumline by her upper incisors and canines. The gumline is receding and now it seems like perhaps there are little areas of hair loss on the external skin between her lip and nose that may be secondary to inflammation caused by it.  It appears that she grooms her sister quite a bit. They are about 5 years old now.  The other otter does not have this problem. When anesthetized for their annual exam, we perform a dental cleaning and have a very difficult time getting all of it out. Even if we cut the gumline.  It's up into the sockets.  Has anyone experienced this and had some success in reducing this grooming behavior or any tricks for getting the wedged hair out?  Trainers have been proactive with trying a  toothbrush and tweezers daily to  see if there are any fresh tufts that they are able to remove easily.  I was thinking of trying to train a water pick or something but not sure how that will go over or help.  They are not currently on any birth control and are the only individuals in the exhibit. As always thanks for your helpful input Rebecca --  Rebecca Wells Gulfarium Marine Adventure Park 1010 Miracle Strip Parkway SE Fort Walton Beach, FL 32548 c: (850) 691-9799 --  For continued discussion on this topic, responses may also be directed to the AAZV Website Forums athttp://www.aazv.org/forums/Default.aspx. If an appropriate forum topic category is not found for your topic, please emailtgcurro@gmail.com to suggest new forum topic heading categories. ---  You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "AAZV-L" group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aazv-l+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com. To post to this group, send email to aazv-l@googlegroups.com. Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/group/aazv-l. For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout. --  For continued discussion on this topic, responses may also be directed to the AAZV Website Forums athttp://www.aazv.org/forums/Default.aspx. If an appropriate forum topic category is not found for your topic, please emailtgcurro@gmail.com to suggest new forum topic heading categories. ---  You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "AAZV-L" group. To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to aazv-l+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com. To post to this group, send email to aazv-l@googlegroups.com. Visit this group at https://groups.google.com/group/aazv-l. For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.
by T. Curro
Wednesday, March 22, 2017
Cavity in a two-toed sloth 0 M. Limoges Our eleven year-old female sloth has a fairly deep (1/4-1/3 thickness of the whole tooth) concave indentation at the gumline on a maxillary caniniform tooth. It is significant enough that on another species (e.g. carnivore) I would restore the tooth, or even consider extracting it. Not sure how to handle it in the case of a sloth with continually growing teeth though.  Any thoughts?
by M. Limoges
Friday, May 13, 2016
Feb 2015 Listserv - Giraffe mandibular fracture/suggestions? 1 A. Nicholson call me biased, but you may want to check this young un for an odontogenic tumor  - by Mike Garner on Feb 24   They had a fracture similar to that in one of our female giraffes a few years back, elected to do a hemimandibulectomy, animal is still doing well. It was before my time here, but I believe Chris Hanley down in St Louis could give you more info on that case. The periosteal proliferation is the disturbing part, if this was indeed an acute injury that was noted in a timely fashion. May suggest a more insidious cause.......  - by Ric Berlinski, DVM   As an equally unbiased pathologist, I agree with Mike. That lesion needs to be biopsied.  - by Yvonne   I monitor discussions quite closely with your list serve and will humbly give my opinion since this problem involves my interest...the oral cavity. There are multiple options to fix fractures within the interdetnal space. These would include: tension-band wiring, oral acrylic splints with/without wire, U-bars, external fixators and bone plating. External fixators and bone plating would not be my first choice due to developing tooth buds (canines, pm). Rostral mandibulectomy would only be an option if this became a non-union or was pathologic. I won't disagree the need to rule out pathologic reason for fracture (odontogenic, other tumor) which can be done with good intraoral RADs. Awesome case. If I can help further let me know. Thanks for letting me give my opinion. Regards, Douglas K. Winter, DVM, Dipl. AVDC   I recommend any diagnosis be confirmed histologically before attempting any further treatment or other. it would be unwise (and embarrassing) to euthanize an animal due to a radiographic diagnosis of neoplasia, and then find that histologically the lesion was an abscess.  - by Mike Garner   I agree with Michael. But even so, check the hay rack: if it has vertical bars, the anterior part of the head may get stuck between those bars. When the animal suddenly frightens, it can easily fracture the mandible or maxilla. I prefer a net or wire mesh to provide roughage to these animals. Regards, Willem Schaftenaar DVM   The images appear similar to our 6y male retic, diagnosed by biopsy with an odontogenic mandibular tumor at 3y and stable to date without adverse local invasion or expansion. - by Robert MacLean, DVM
by A. Nicholson
Friday, March 6, 2015
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